Representative 3D models of modern and fossil Hexactinellida sponges

Virtual Collection: Class Hexactinellida

This virtual collection was last curated by Jonathan Hendricks on June 5, 2019. Each model is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. Unless otherwise indicated, each model was created by Emily Hauf using specimens at the Paleontological Research Institution, Ithaca, New York.

Class Hexactinellida


Modern specimen of the glass sponge Euplectella sp., also known as “Venus’ Flower Basket” (locality information not available). Specimen is from the teaching collections of the Paleontological Research Institution. Length of specimen is approximately 22 cm.


Fossil specimen of the glass sponge Hydnoceras tuberosum from the Devonian of Steuben County, New York (PRI 76741). Specimen is from the collections of the Paleontological Research Institution, Ithaca, New York. Length of specimen is approximately 26 cm.


Fossil specimen of the glass sponge Uphantaenia chemungensis from the Devonian Enfield Formation of Tompkins County, New York (PRI 76745). Specimen is from the collections of the Paleontological Research Institution, Ithaca, New York. Maximum diameter of specimen (not including surrounding rock matrix) is approximately 11.5 cm.


Fossil specimen of the glass sponge Coeloptychium agaricoides from the Upper Cretaceous of Hannover, Germany (PRI 70599). Specimen is from the research collections of the Paleontological Research Institution, Ithaca, New York. Specimen is approximately 11 cm in diameter.


Fossil specimen of the glass sponge Trochobolus cylindratus from the Jurassic of Zalas, Poland (PRI 76848). Specimen is from the research collections of the Paleontological Research Institution, Ithaca, New York. Length of specimen is approximately 7.5 cm.

"Heteractinida" (stem-group hexactinellids)


Fossil specimen of the sponge Astraeospongium meniscus from the Silurian Niagara Group of Perry County, Tennessee (PRI 76744). Specimen is from the collections of the Paleontological Research Institution, Ithaca, New York. Maximum diameter of specimen is approximately 8 cm.